Monday, October 15, 2012

Thinning Hair Feature - Nioxin

The Skinny on Hair Loss

According to the good folks at NIOXIN, thinning hair affects men and women of all ages. The cause is often genetic, and can also be triggered by certain life stages. Hair cells reproduce at a faster rate than any other in our bodies, so they are also sensitive to changes in our health or environment. Addressing thinning begins with understanding what causes and contributes to it, and the early warning signs to look out for.

KNOWN FACTORS AND REASONS

GENETICS
A common family predisposition involves natural, age-related hormonal changes that can trigger hair loss. This is caused by the conversion of testosterone into the toxin Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and can be inherited from either your mother or your father.

STRESS AND TRAUMA
Stress can produce increased levels of testosterone, which converts to DHT and interrupts the hair’s growth cycle. Stress also constricts blood supply through the capillaries, restricting oxygen and nutrient uptake and vitamins to the hair follicle.

NUTRITION AND DIET
What you eat can play a significant role in hair thinning. A high consumption of animal fats, rapid weight loss and liquid protein diets can result in a lack of amino acids, biotin, iron, protein and zinc — all of which are essential for healthy-looking hair.

HEALTH ISSUES
Several underlying health issues can cause hair thinning, including a malfunctioning of the hormone-producing thyroid gland and the natural hormonal changes women experience after pregnancy and during the menopause.

ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS
Air and water pollutants, chlorine, metals and minerals may be left on the scalp and hair as we wash with water every day, contributing to thinning. Pollutants such as pseudo-estrogens and toxins from within our bodies are also a factor.

MEDICATION
The hair follicle is incredibly sensitive to changes in the body. Any hormone therapy (including birth control) can contribute to hair thinning, as can steroids, specific chemotherapies, and medication for blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease and acne.


HOW TO TELL IF THINNING HAIR MIGHT AFFECT YOU IN THE FUTURE
SCALP CONCERNS
Dryness and oiliness are both indications of an unhealthy scalp environment, which can inhibit healthy hair growth. Seborrhea is a condition in which an excessive amount of sebum is produced and builds up on the scalp (looking like an adult cradle cap), pointing to the hormonal imbalances associated with hair loss.

AREAS OF CONCERN
A receding hairline or thinning crown are indications of male pattern baldness, while noticeably wider part, thinning on the sides of the head or a smaller ponytail are signs of diffused thinning in women.

DAILY HAIR LOSS
It is normal to lose around 100 individual hair strands a day, but in order to maintain hair’s current volume it must be replaced at the same rate. If you notice more hair than usual in the shower or in your hairbrush after brushing, your hair will begin to look thinner.

EXCESSIVE BODY HAIR
In general, the more body hair a man has, the greater his risk of becoming bald. For example, if he has substantial chest, shoulder and back hair, he is 70% more likely to experience balding. For women, excessive body or facial hair can indicate the same hormonal imbalances that cause thinning. 


FIND A SOLUTION TO THIN-LOOKING HAIR THAT’S TAILORED TO YOU 

Thinning hair is a common problem, affecting 78% of men and women of all ages.* The NIOXIN Consultation Tool takes less than three minutes to complete and will help you assess your needs. Try it for yourself here: http://nioxin.com/en-US/consultation-tool-page.aspx.

Disclosure: No compensation was offered or taken in exchange for this feature article. None of the editorial staff at FOH have any affiliation to Nioxin.

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